Hypermedia

The PDF format is used to allow ease of reuse of figures and text, quoted with citation.

Publication citations are given where a version of the report has been published. Often material has been edited in publication and the cited version differs to some extent.

Medical applications of programmable audio-visual displays, John L Gedye & Brian R Gaines, Digest 7th International Conference Medical Biological Engineering, 226, Stockholm, 1967. PDF.

Work is proceeding at present on both the technical development of audio-visual displays and their application as active interfaces in a variety of situations.

Videotex: the electronic challenge, Brian R Gaines, In C. Goodacre (Ed.), Penrose 1982: International Review of the Graphic Arts, 47-56, London: Northwood Publications, 1982. PDF.

Videotex. the electronic dissemination of text and graphics direct to the home and office through television and telephone, offers a challenging new publishing medium. The publishing industry has responded to this challenge as it did to the earlier opportunity afforded by commercial television and many publishers are now Prestel information providers. However, the videotex medium is still in its infancy and primitive in its capabilities compared with more mature media and its technology is changing rapidly. The author has been associated with videotex since its inception and developed the first private teletext and viewdata systems, which were installed in a London stockbroker's offices in 1978. In this article he outlines the state-of┬Ěthe-art in videotex systems and highlights its main directions of development.

An agenda for digital journals: the socio-technical infrastructure of knowledge dissemination, Brian R Gaines, Journal of Organizational Computing, 3(2) 135-193, 1993. PDF.

Increasing ease of access to the Internet is making it feasible for geographically dispersed communities to work closely together, coordinating their activities through electronic mail, digital document archives, and access to remote computing facilities. The support of the collaboration through digital discourse also makes it feasible to disseminate the results of the collaboration to others through the same media, for example through World-Wide Web or CD-ROM. This presentation reports on practical experience of supporting a number of communities and projects through the use of the Internet and CD-ROM. It gives an overview of the technologies available, their accessibility, ease of use and impact on collaborative activities. It focuses on the practical problems that arise, the limitations of existing technologies, and how these may be overcome. Examples are given of projects encompassing a range of multimedia digital technologies from list servers, through World-Wide Web document archives, to production in a few days of CD-ROMs containing movies and digitized foils and documents giving a complete account of working meetings.

Supporting collaboration through multimedia digital archives, Brian R Gaines, Canadian Multimedia Conference Proceedings. Katz, L., Mayo, M. & Richardson, B., Eds. 8-63. Alberta, Canada: University of Calgary, 1994. PDF.

Increasing ease of access to the Internet is making it feasible for geographically dispersed communities to work closely together, coordinating their activities through electronic mail, digital document archives, and access to remote computing facilities. The support of the collaboration through digital discourse also makes it feasible to disseminate the results of the collaboration to others through the same media, for example through World-Wide Web or CD-ROM. This presentation reports on practical experience of supporting a number of communities and projects through the use of the Internet and CD-ROM. It gives an overview of the technologies available, their accessibility, ease of use and impact on collaborative activities. It focuses on the practical problems that arise, the limitations of existing technologies, and how these may be overcome. Examples are given of projects encompassing a range of multimedia digital technologies from list servers, through World-Wide Web document archives, to production in a few days of CD-ROMs containing movies and digitized foils and documents giving a complete account of working meetings.

Concept maps as hypermedia components, Brian R Gaines and Mildred L G Shaw, International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 43(3), 323-361, 1995. PDF.

Concept mapping has a history of use in many disciplines as a formal or semi-formal diagramming technique. Concept maps have an abstract structure as typed hypergraphs, and computer support for concept mapping can associate visual attributes with node types to provide an attractive and consistent appearance. Computer support can also provide interactive interfaces allowing arbitrary actions to be associated with nodes such as hypermedia links to other maps and documents. This article describes a general concept mapping system that is open architecture for integration with other systems, scriptable to support arbitrary interactions and computations, and cutomizable to emulate many styles of map. The system supports collaborative development of concept maps across local area and wide area networks, and integrates with World-Wide Web in both client helper and server gateway roles. A number of applications are illustrated ranging through education, artificial intelligence, active documents, hypermedia indexing and concurrent engineering. It is proposed that concept maps be regarded as basic components of any hypermedia system, complementing text and images with formal and semi-formal active diagrams.

Porting interactive applications to the web, B.R.Gaines, Tutorial Proceedings of WWW4: Fourth International World Wide Web Conference. 199-217. Boston, December, 1995. PDF.

This tutorial is targeted on developers porting interactive applications from personal computers to operate in a client-server mode on World Wide Web (the web).The tutorial will be useful to thoseinvolved in porting, those responsible for estimating and managing porting effort, and those investigating the feasibility of porting applications to the web. A background in software development and basic knowledge of HTML/HTTP is assumed.

WebMap: Concept mapping on the web, B.R.Gaines and M.L.G.Shaw, Proceedings of WWW4: Fourth International World Wide Web Conference. Boston, December, 1995 (World Wide Web Journal, 1(1) 171-183, 1995). PDF.

Concept maps have long provided visual languages widely used in many different disciplines and application domains. This article reports experience in taking an existing open architecture concept mapping tool and making it available on the web in a number of ways: as a client helper downloading and uploading concept maps; as an active controller of the browser, indexing multimedia material through URLs embedded in concept maps; as a concept map creator controlled by the browser, generating concept maps through the browsing process; and as an auxiliary HTTP server making concept maps available as clickable maps for users who do not have the client helper or want to use active concept maps embedded in documents.

Knowledge acquisition processes in Internet communities, L.L.-J.Chen and B.R.Gaines, Proceedings of the Tenth Knowledge Acquisition for Knowledge-Based Systems Workshop. pp.43-1-43-19, 1996. PDF.

With the growth of usage of List Severs and the World Wide Web the Internet has become a major resource for the acquisition of knowledge, and it has given new prominence to human discourse as a continuing source of knowledge. The society of distributed intelligent agents that is the Internet community at large provides an 'expert system' with a scope and scale well beyond that yet conceivable with computer-based systems alone. It is important to model and support the processes by which knowledge is acquired through the net. In developing new support tools is one asks "what is the starting point for the person seeking information, the existing information that is the basis for their search." A support tool is then one that takes that existing information and uses it to present further information that is likely to be relevant. Such information may include relevant concepts, text, existing documents, people, sites, list servers, news groups, and so on. The support system may provide links to further examples of all of these based on content, categorization or linguistic or logical inference. The outcome of the search may be access to a document but it may also be email to a person, a list or a news group. This articles develops a model of services and knowledge processes on the Internet, describes various forms of support tool, and categorizes them in terms of the model.

A software architecture for porting interactive applications to the web, Brian R. Gaines and Mildred L G Shaw, 1998. PDF.

This article addresses porting interactive applications to operate in a client-server mode on the World Wide Web (the web). A software architecture is described that factors the application into its user interface module and an interface-independent service module. The user interface module is further factored into generic modules that can be written once as a shell, and implementation-specific modules that differentiate the stand-alone application from the web implementation. Relevant features of HTML as a graphic user interface programming language are analyzed, as are issues of storing the application state at the client or the server.


CPCS 30-May-2012