Slide Show Exercise

CPSC581.ExerciseSlideshow History

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!Deliverables
* email your powerpoint to me, along with instructions on how to drive it
* demonstrate your powerpoint in class.
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!Part 3
Recreate your storyboard as a partial comic strip that shows a person using that feature in their real world setting. The point here is to show an expected scenario of use - the spirit of interaction - rather than the specific interaction details. This type of storyboard can complement the one you created in Part 2.

!!!!Hints.
* Start by composing a story - a paragraph or two - that you believe best captures the spirit of interaction in a real world setting. A story that shows someone interacting with the device in a non-routine situation may be good as it will 'stress' particulars of the interaction, e.g., showing a friend your music on an ipod, and sampling through selected ones; selecting cell phone options while driving, etc.
* You don't have to be a great artist to create a comic strip. The important think is that the illustrations -the people, the things in it, the backdrop - capture the essence of the story.
* Feel free to use comic book tricks to tell the story - speech / though bubbles, narrative boxes, scene-setters and closeups, etc.
* model your storyboard after the ones shown on p286-297 from the reading
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* '''Visual Storytelling'''. 297-210. in Buxton, B. Sketching User Experiences, Morgan Kaufmann.
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* '''Visual Storytelling'''. 299-307. in Buxton, B. Sketching User Experiences, Morgan Kaufmann.
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(:title Slide Show Exercise :)
'''-[[CPSC581/Courses|back to CPSC 581]]-'''

!Overview
Slide Show - a sequence of key images portraying a story of the user experiencee presented as a slide show, perhaps with simple animation - is a simple yet highly effective method to capture not only the primary scenes, but the interaction feel as well taken by a person while using the system over time. Storyboarding is excellent at
* illustrating the look of the user
* animating the feel (the interaction)
* giving the option to provide limited end user interaction (e.g., by clicking) to animate transitions (possiblly through multiple paths)
* playng back an animation that shows the end user interaction

!Readings
* '''Visual Storytelling'''. 297-210. in Buxton, B. Sketching User Experiences, Morgan Kaufmann.

!Part 1.
Use your templates and interface created for Assignment 1 for a known interaction sequence or by replicating one of the examples in the Buxton reading using Powerpoint. Create:
# a slide show where the end user drives the transitions
# an animation where the system drives the transitions

For these examples, you must include at least the following techniques:
* use of hyperlinks
* use of simple animation through paths
* use of various techniques for having animations appear/disappear

!Part 2
Repeat the above, but use it to illustrate a simple brand new interface design of your choice.

!!!!Hints.
* Start by composing the various visual elements you need as a collection, where items are grouped for convenience
* If you are using multiple slides, create a marker on every slide so that you can register things appropriately i.e., visual elements should not shift between transitions

!Part 3
Recreate your storyboard as a partial comic strip that shows a person using that feature in their real world setting. The point here is to show an expected scenario of use - the spirit of interaction - rather than the specific interaction details. This type of storyboard can complement the one you created in Part 2.

!!!!Hints.
* Start by composing a story - a paragraph or two - that you believe best captures the spirit of interaction in a real world setting. A story that shows someone interacting with the device in a non-routine situation may be good as it will 'stress' particulars of the interaction, e.g., showing a friend your music on an ipod, and sampling through selected ones; selecting cell phone options while driving, etc.
* You don't have to be a great artist to create a comic strip. The important think is that the illustrations -the people, the things in it, the backdrop - capture the essence of the story.
* Feel free to use comic book tricks to tell the story - speech / though bubbles, narrative boxes, scene-setters and closeups, etc.
* model your storyboard after the ones shown on p286-297 from the reading

!Possible Links of interest
To be filled in shortly