Clarifications About Duties

Personal.ClarificationsAboutDuties History

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3.0 < Score < 4, (uncertain outcome)

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3.0 < Score < 4, (uncertain outcome)\\

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4.3 <= Score <= 5 : we expect to accept these papers outright.

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4.3 <= Score <= 5 : we expect to accept these papers outright.\\

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Score 4 <= Score < 4.3 (tentative accept) These papers will likely be accepted. If you agree with the 1AC decision and reviewer comments after a light read, that is all you will have to do. But if you find you disagree, then this would require a closer look at the paper and you writing down your opinion to remind yourself of what the issues are. Some papers in this category may be considered for best paper as well; if so, your judgment would be appreciated.

2.7 < Score < 3, (tentative reject)

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Score 4 <= Score < 4.3 (tentative accept)
These papers will likely be accepted. If you agree with the 1AC decision and reviewer comments after a light read, that is all you will have to do. But if you find you disagree, then this would require a closer look at the paper and you writing down your opinion to remind yourself of what the issues are. Some papers in this category may be considered for best paper as well; if so, your judgment would be appreciated.

2.7 < Score < 3, (tentative reject)\\

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Hi all ACs / 2nd ACs

Due to feedback from some of you, I want to clarify your work load with highly ranked and low-ranked papers. You may be feeling somewhat overwhelmed at this point. The idea is that you should balance your work to match expectations - not all papers/notes will require the same degree of scrutiny. So here is a rephrasing of some of the criteria to help you consider the level of scrutiny.

But before that, a word about papers vs notes. Looking over the scores, it appears that Notes are being judged much more harshly than Papers. This could be due to the fact that AC and reviewer expectations are too high for what can reasonably fit in a four page paper (in which case we need to recalibrate note scoring), or that more people submit 'bad' notes (in which case scoring is ok), or most likely it is some combination of the two. At this point, we suggest that, when you look at notes reviews, ask yourself if the expectations are set too high. If the answer is 'yes', go a bit 'easier' on their scoring. We don't want to be in a situation where (say) the acceptance rate for notes is 12% vs 24% for papers (figures are made up).

Ok, back to scoring expectations. In all this, the idea is that submissions should have a 2nd voice at the meeting. This is not only to decide on borderline papers, but also on whether excellent papers deserve to be nominated as best paper. So here is some rough rules of thumb (but use your judgment).

3.0 < Score < 4, (uncertain outcome) These papers will spark the most discussion, and are the likeliest to be the ones that need the most scrutiny from you as 2nd AC.

4.3 <= Score <= 5 : we expect to accept these papers outright. Your primary role in these papers as a 2nd AC is to see if this paper deserves a best paper nomination; you can discuss this with the 1st AC at the meeting. Thus we don't really expect you to do a heavy read or write an additional review or opinion unless you want to (or to remind yourself of why it should be a best paper nominee). But if you see something serious that others have missed, you may want to raise it as an issue.

Score 4 <= Score < 4.3 (tentative accept) These papers will likely be accepted. If you agree with the 1AC decision and reviewer comments after a light read, that is all you will have to do. But if you find you disagree, then this would require a closer look at the paper and you writing down your opinion to remind yourself of what the issues are. Some papers in this category may be considered for best paper as well; if so, your judgment would be appreciated.

2.7 < Score < 3, (tentative reject) These papers are likely candidates for rejection (but see discussion about Notes above). If you agree with the 1AC decision and reviewer comments after a light read, that is all you will have to do. But if you find you disagree, then this would require a closer look at the paper and you writing down your opinion to remind yourself of what the issues are.

Saul and Scott