March 4

Sketching.March4 History

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!!Table of Contents

'''PART 1: GETTING INTO THE MOOD'''
# INTRODUCTION – ''DONE'' – 4 PAGES [SAUL]
** What this book is about, pointer to Bill’s book, why sketch (brief), audience.
# WHY SHOULD I SKETCH? - ''DONE'' – 6 PAGES [SAUL]
** Synopsis of Bill’s book
# THE SKETCHBOOK – ''DONE'' – 4 PAGES [SAUL]

'''PART 2: SAMPLING THE REAL WORLD'''
* This section will describe the value of gathering material from the world around us. It will emphasize the benefits of copying and modifying ideas of others, of using found material for inspiration, of using these to seed brainstorming, and so on. The role of research outcomes and how to share this material in a group is also discussed.
# SCRIBBLE SKETCHING - ''DONE'' – 4 PAGES [SAUL]
# PHOTOGRAPHS
# THE CLIPPING FILE ''(photo montage, cutting images, evergreen?)'' [SHEELAGH?]
# THE TOY BOX ''(tech box similar to toy box?)'' [SHEELAGH?]
# SHARING FOUND OBJECTS [SHEELAGH]?
** e.g., bulletin board, Portfolio Wall, cabinet? Although it may be hard to get someone to make or own specialized software, we can work around this concept by sharing work on a large display (tabletop, big screen monitor), or just by simply clipping print outs on a wall. CoWall (It might be too much work to ask someone to set up the projector. A simpler approach may be to attach paper descriptions for each object). Bill’s book has a few other ideas; also see also Ideo book.

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'''''General Note'''''
* It’s fairly hard to categorize sketch methods, but we are using the ones below
* The primary organizational principle used is to consider how different methods unfold the ‘time’ dimension. That is, the basic sections begin with methods that just show a moment in time, while following sections show discrete moments in time, then moving through continuous sequences.
* A 2ndary organizational principle is the involvement of the end user in the actual interaction sequence, i.e., where it can be used to only show, or whether a person can interact with the sequence
* A 3rd organizational principle is the simplicity vs. sophistication of the technique.

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'''PART 3: THE SINGLE IMAGE'''
* This section discusses a sketch as a single moment in time. That is, it just captures a single scene. No sequences are covered here. However, we should include the notion of annotations, descriptions, etc. In this particular case, the person has to image the entire sequence around the image in the mind’s eye. Also mention what it is not good for, i.e., for sequences that have to be explicit.
# TEN IDEAS, TEN VARIATIONS [SAUL]
** describes how to sketch 10 different ideas, chose 1 (or 2)
** matches The Funnel Design
# THE BASIC SKETCH (can describe some figure drawing here) [SHEELAGH]
** HOW YOU SEE
** UPSIDE DOWN DRAWING…
** NICOLAIDES (Putting Emotion In)
** PAUL CLAYS (Line Quality)
# TEMPLATES - ''DONE'' - 6 PAGES [SAUL]
# VANILLA SKETCH / ANNOTATED SKETCH - The Basic Drawing, Plus Annotation (Location –Dependent Text) Plus Notes (N0n-Location dependent Text)
** SHEELAGH or SAUL
# SLIDEWARE (PowerPoint, Interface Builders, etc.)
** SHEELAGH or SAUL
** could discuss rendering here e.g. Fidelity
# HYBRID SKETCH - Not sure what this is. I Forgot!
** Check Bill's book.
# SPIRIT OF THE SETTING (includes a picture of the user scene for the purpose of applying mood and context of use pg. 288)
# FOAM CORE (may go under The Single Image section)
** or maybe generalize as Using Other Materials: Plastic, Paperboard, Foam Core, etc.

'''PART 4: SNAPSHOTS OF TIME'''
* This section discusses a series of discrete images that unfolds a story over time. Also talks about '''Transitions''' (ie. using arrows, scripting)
# BASIC STORYBOARDING (pg. 277)
# STATE DIAGRAM
# FLOW DIAGRAM ? Check Bill's book.

'''PART 5: ANIMATED SEQUENCE'''
* When a storyboard has fine-grained transitions that visually lead from one step to the next, one can ‘play’ the storyboard as a sequence.
# CREATING A FLIPBOOK - CAN BE DIGITAL (e.g. animated GIF, Flash, PowerPoint) AND ON PAPER
# LINEAR VIDEO – ''DONE'' (Post-It Notes) [SAUL]
** maybe add other video envisionment examples such as Pencil Duplicator, Office of the Professional, Clearboard III
# BRANCHING – showing this with state diagrams would be nice (this overlaps with Interactive Sequences) (Flash, PowerPoint using motion paths)

'''PART 6: SEQUENCES INVOLVING USER INTERACTION'''
* While the above plays back a story, or branches of a story, another form of sequence actually involves an ‘end user’ as a player, where they have the illusion that their actions affects the underlying dialog.
# SCRIPTED SLIDE SHOW
# PICTIVE
# SHOOT AND MIME (need to create animation first and then record the mime with the animation) Check Bill's book.
# WIZARD OF OZ
# USING OTHER MATERIALS?
** (e.g. magnets with sketch-a-move, cardboard box with bi-focal display)

'''PART 7: INTERACTIVE MODELING'''
# INTERFACE BUILDERS
# FLASH
# SATE OF THE ART SKETCHING SYSTEMS
# PHIDGETS

'''PART 8: SHARING WITH OTHERS'''
* This section describes how to make a good memorable story in words. Storytelling is important in design, but no one wants to hear a boring story. There are some fundamental rules/techniques that can used to help tell a playful and memorable story. This section will describe these techniques. Visual Storytelling on screen and paper is explained in the latter sections.
# PUBLIC SKETCHES (invite, suggest and questions) [MAYBE MOVE INTO OTHER SECTION]
** sketching walls in public places…
# ROLE PLAYING (assumes and acts out the role of the user, and the role of the product) [UNLIKELY]
# BODYSTORMING (describe the use of acting our as a means to generate new ideas and insights about a particular question or problem) [UNLIKELY]
# ACTING WITH PROPS (this can be combined with collecting objects to generate more ideas) [UNLIKELY]

'''PART 9: CRITIQUING'''
* This section discusses how to run an effective design critique:
# HOW TO RUN A CRIT BUXTON’S BOOK (page 200-204) [SHEELAGH]
** Lots more here: http://www.scottberkun.com/essays/23-how-to-run-a-design-critique/
** Should have several examples of how to do it.
*** ONE THING YOU LIKED, ONE THING YOU WOULD IMPROVE
*** ONLY ALLOWED TO SAY POSITIVE THINGS
*** ONLY ALLOW IMPROVEMENTS (e.g. no negative comments unless one can offer a positive alternative)
# EVALUATING [USER TESTING] [SAUL]
** Usability testing and evaluation can be taken place during the sketching stage. This section shows how to do this.


'''OTHER SOURCES I.E.. REFERENCES'''
* WHAT WE USE
* WHAT OTHERS HAVE COVERED THAT WE DON’T TALK ABOUT OR GO INTO GREATER DEPTH

'''APPENDIX'''
* Registering Images Technique
* Making Video?
* Editing Video Technique
* Others?

'''OTHERS THINGS WE MIGHT WANT TO MENTION…'''
* Evaluating Designs / Critiques (excercises, rules on how to do this)
* Checklist: keep all sketches: quick, timely, disposable, plentiful, clear vocabulary, etc.
* Reminder from Bill (can't remember context of this:) Look up buxton and Zhai paper on bill's web site, also paper on proximity
* http://www.billbuxton.com/inputManuscript.html
* using camera/pdas vs projector vs... head mounted difft technologies for mobile AR. Most difficult problem is registration problem.
* http://billbuxton.com/multitouchOverview.html